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❶Then fold up the slips, and tuck each slip inside a different balloon. Refer to your notes in naming important events, and remember to note when the climax of the story takes place.

Two things have changed

For High School and Middle School Students
Step One. Read the Book Attentively
Language & Lit

Characters Come to Life. Each student creates life-size "portraits" of one of the characters from a book just read. The portrait should include a written piece that tells about the character. The piece might also include information about events, traits, or conflicts in the book that involve that character. Hang the students' portraits in a class gallery. Prove It in Five Minutes.

Each student gives a second 2-minute oral presentation in which he or she shares information about a book's plot and characters. The student closes the presentation by offering an opinion and recommendation about the book. Then students in the audience have seconds to question the presenter about the book. If the presenter is able to prove in five minutes that he or she read the book, the student is excused from filing a written report about it.

After reading a book, each student creates a picture book version of the story that would appeal to younger students. The students can then share the picture books with a group of young students. As a tie-in to your career education program, challenge each student to create a resume for a book character. The student should include in the resume a statement of the applicant's goals and a detailed account of his or her experience and outside interests.

Each student creates a chart with three columns. Each column is headed with the name of one of the book's characters. As the student reads the book, he or she can keep a record of the traits each character possesses and include an incident that supports each trait. Challenge each student to select a concept or a thing from the book just finished and to use library or Internet resources to explore it further. The student then writes a two-page report that shares information about the topic.

To learn more about the setting of a book, each student writes a one-page report explaining how that setting was important to the story. The entries should share details about the story that will prove the student read the book. You can find curated collections of high-interest fiction and non-fiction texts at Steps to Literacy. Steps to Literacy offers inclusive and differentiated collections of age and developmentally appropriate books and resources that engage students and foster a love for reading within each of them.

Learn more about building your own customized classroom library. More than 1, FREE lessons. PD content to get you through the day. Download without a subscription. Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips. Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips Thank you for subscribing to the Educationworld. Classroom Problem Solver Dr. Make A Book Report Sandwich! On the top slice of bread, each student wrote the title and the author of the book the student had just finished reading.

On the lettuce, the student wrote a brief summary of the book. The student wrote about the main character on the tomato slice. On the mayonnaise, the student described the book's setting.

The student shared the book's climax on the Swiss cheese. On the ham slice, the student described the plot. On the bottom piece of bread, the student drew a favorite scene from the story.

They were instructed to include the following: Questions Write ten questions based on the book. Five of the questions can be about general content, but the other five must require more thinking. Vocabulary Create a ten-word glossary of unfamiliar words from the book.

Things Include five things that have a connection to the story. The ideas appeal to many different learning styles. Many of the ideas involve making choices, organizing information -- and writing!

Most of the ideas will provide teachers with a clear idea about whether students actually read the book. And all the ideas will engage students, help make books come alive for them, and challenge them to think in different ways about the books they read!

Trending Icebreakers Volume 5: It's time to make a fresh start. You've done some summer reading on classroom management, and you're eager to try out some new ideas. You've learned from past mistakes, and you look forward this year to avoiding those mistakes. Most fun of all, the opening days of school are an opportunity to get to know a whole new group of kids! What will you do during those first few days of school?

What activities might you do to help you get to know your new students? What activities will help students get to know you and one another? For the last three years, Education World has presented a new group of getting-to-know-you ideas -- or icebreakers -- for those first days of school.

Here are 19 ideas -- ideas tried and tested by Education World readers -- to help develop classroom camaraderie during the opening days of school. Opening-Day Letter Still looking for more ideas? Don't forget our archive of more than icebreaker activities. Write a letter to your students.

In that letter, introduce yourself to students. Tell them about your hopes for the new school year and some of the fun things you'll be doing in class. In addition, tell students a few personal things about yourself; for example, your likes and dislikes, what you did over the summer, and your hobbies.

Ask questions throughout the letter. You might ask what students like most about school, what they did during the summer, what their goals for the new school year are, or what they are really good at.

In your letter, be sure to model the correct parts of a friendly letter! On the first day of school, display your letter on an overhead projector. Then pass each student a sheet of nice stationery.

Have the students write return letters to you. In this letter, they will need to answer some of your questions and tell you about themselves. This is a great way to get to know each other in a personal way! Mail the letter to students before school starts, and enclose a sheet of stationery for kids to write you back.

Each piece should have a matching piece of the same length. There should be enough pieces so that each student will have one.

Then give each student one piece of string, and challenge each student to find the other student who has a string of the same length. After students find their matches, they can take turns introducing themselves to one another. You can provide a list of questions to help students "break the ice," or students can come up with their own.

You might extend the activity by having each student introduce his or her partner to the class. Give each student a slip of paper with the name of an animal on it. Then give students instructions for the activity: They must locate the other members of their animal group by imitating that animal's sound only.

No talking is allowed. The students might hesitate initially, but that hesitation soon gives way to a cacophony of sound as the kids moo, snort, and giggle their way into groups. The end result is that students have found their way into their homerooms or advisory groups for the school year, and the initial barriers to good teamwork have already been broken.

Hold a large ball of yarn. Start by telling the students something about yourself. Then roll the ball of yarn to a student without letting go of the end of the yarn. The student who gets the ball of yarn tells his or her name and something good about himself or herself.

Then the student rolls the yarn to somebody else, holding on to the strand of yarn. Soon students have created a giant web. After everyone has spoken, you and all the students stand up, continuing to hold the yarn. Start a discussion of how this activity relates to the idea of teamwork -- for example, the students need to work together and not let others down. To drive home your point about teamwork, have one student drop his or her strand of yarn; that will demonstrate to students how the web weakens if the class isn't working together.

Questions might include the following: What is your name? Where were you born? How many brothers or sisters do you have? What are their names? Do you have any pets? Tell students to write those questions on a piece of paper and to add to that paper five more questions they could ask someone they don't know.

Pair students, and have each student interview his or her partner and record the responses. Then have each student use the interview responses to write a "dictionary definition" of his or her partner to include in a Student Dictionary. You might model this activity by creating a sample dictionary definition about yourself. Born in Riverside, California.

No brothers or sisters. Have students bring in small pictures of themselves to paste next to their entries in the Student Dictionary.

Bind the definitions into a book, and display it at back-to-school night. Ask each student to write a brief description of his or her physical characteristics on one index card and his or her name on the other. Physical characteristics usually do not include clothing, but if you teach the primary grades, you might allow students to include clothing in their descriptions.

Put all the physical characteristic index cards in a shoe box, mix them up, and distribute one card to each student, making sure that no student gets his or her own card. Give students ten minutes to search for the person who fits the description on the card they hold. Your outline is easy. You will use the categories above or what your teacher recommends. Be sure you have three or four main ideas in each category.

With this, the report should be easy to write. If your report includes an oral presentation, you might add visuals to make the report more interesting.

Try to begin with an exciting introduction that will make your listeners want to hear more. How to write a Good Essay. What makes a Great Essay? Your email address will not be published. Skip to primary content. Skip to secondary content. Writing Great Book Reports: Fiction and Nonfiction You probably began writing book reports in elementary school. Book Reports in lower grades were easy.

They might tell you to include: Writing a Book Report on a work of Nonfiction This is less common but could be assigned in classes such as history or science. They will probably want: The following part of the report contains the summary of the book: A few pertinent quotes will not be excessive. Generally, that is all that has to be included in the report. Knowing the basics of preparing a report a student will not have troubles understanding how to write a review of a book. When writing a book review a student has to keep in mind that, in a contrary to the report, the review is not a content summary and there is no point in retelling the story.

Although all the elements of a simple report can be included in the review in a brief form, the main part of the work must be dedicated to the analysis of the book: The core of any review is a personal opinion, new ideas and angles of perception: This simple algorithm not only facilitates writing book reviews but also gives students a hint on how to write a book critique.

However, they differ in their ultimate aim:

The art of writing a book review

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Writing a high school book report includes the book's major events. Once the characters have been introduced, move on to a description of the plot. Refer to your notes in naming important events, and remember to note when the climax of the story takes place.

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There are some differences between reports on fiction or other imaginative writing and reports on non-fiction books. But for both, a good place to start is to explain the author's purpose and/or the main themes of the book.

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However, the traditional book report can be amended for the high school level by adding an audience analysis to these basic elements. According to the Purdue Online Writing Lab, academic book reports typically describe . How to Write a High School Book Report. A book report is a difficult assignment for high school students, because it requires attention .

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Begin with a catchy opening statement. Go on to identify the book's title (underlined or italicized), author, type of work (eg. historical novel, not "fictional novel" or just "book"—all novels are fictional, all novels are books), genre (look it up!), and major themes. Many great books have intriguing plots, often involving high action or unforeseen twists. Such a book with a complicated or exciting plot might be a good candidate for a plot-centric book report. Provide an introductory paragraph, briefly touching on only the most essential aspects of the setting and characters.